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Smoking Withdrawl Symtoms

Recovery is a temporary journey of re-adjustment during which the mind and body are allowed to undergo an amazing healing process. Withdrawal effects of giving up smoking surface almost immediately after you have called it quits. During the initial phase the effects may present themselves in an intense shape. But, there is no need to worry much about it. These effects subside as time passes.
The first few weeks after quitting smoking are usually the most difficult and it’s safe to say that it normally takes at least 8-12 weeks before a person starts to feel comfortable with their new lifestyle change of being an ex-smoker.

Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms :

– Cravings to smoke : Cravings for a cigarette are frequent and intense within the first two to three days after stopping. The cravings become less frequent over the next four or five days, but they may increase again and persist for many weeks. Deep breathing and immediate activity will help distract you from your craving. The worst of the cravings usually end within a couple of weeks after breaking free.
– Irritable, cranky : When the nicotine level declines, your body begins to sense the loss. This can cause tension and be symptomatic of the grief process. Deep breathing and exercise will help relieve irritability.
– Insomnia : Your sleeping patterns may be affected once you stop smoking. Difficulties in sleeping will occur due to the absence of nicotine in the brain. Furthermore, lack of sleep will affect your moods in the daytime and also leave you feeling tired and drained.
– Inability to Concentrate : Take regular short breaks from what you are doing, try to eat healthy energizing foods such as fresh fruit and vegetables, drink lots of water to keep the brain hydrated, exercise or keep active and get plenty of fresh air.
– Headache : Half an aspirin should do the trick, but beforehand try to relieve the tension by carrying out a few deep breathing exercises, drinking a glass of water, taking a relaxing bath, going for a gentle walk in the fresh air or lying down for 15 minutes or so. As a last resort take the aspirin.
– Cough : Drinking water and sucking boiled sweets may help to ease the cough, loosen the mucus in your lungs, keep your throat moist and flush the toxins out of your system.
– Tiredness : To boost your energy levels, avoid sugary and processed foods, drink lots of water, snack on seeds, nuts or dried fruit, go for a short but brisk walk if you are feeling tired, take a break from what you are doing and relax and make sure that you eat a good healthy breakfast, which will keep you going at least through the morning.
– Sore throat : A small number of people who stop smoking are affected by chemical changes in their mouths and may suffer minor problems including blisters, sores, and inflammation.
– Constipation, gas, stomach pain : Try to eat fiber-rich foods and lots of fresh fruit and vegetables; prunes are good, drink 8 glasses of water a day and carry out some gentle exercise to stimulate your bowels. Some say that eating chocolate helps too.
– Tightness in the chest : This happens because your body is getting more fresh air than usual. The extra air fills the lungs and makes them feel tighter. This symptom should last for only a day or two after stopping. See your doctor if it persists.
– Tingling sensations : After giving up smoking, your circulation will improve, as more of your smaller blood vessels will open up allowing more oxygen to flow through you body.
– Fatigue
– Dry mouth
– Sore tongue and/or gums
– Postnasal drip

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